Breathe Easy – Nasal Inhaler for Stuffed Passages

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Nasal Inhaler

Is it allergies? Or is it asthma? Impaired breathing is scary under any label. Allergies are our immune systems working in overdrive, overreacting to a perceived invader whether truly harmful or not. For instance, dust or pollen is not usually toxic to the human body, yet reactions to them can go from mild to life threatening for many millions of people.

Asthma is an allergy. Asthma is the inflammation, and resulting swelling of the inside walls of the air passages to and from the lungs. Not only is good air not going in, but the old air filled with carbon dioxide isn’t being expelled back out of the body. The swollen walls produce added mucus, further inhibiting air flow. To aggravate the situation even worse, the muscles on the outside of the passages tighten up and reduce airflow yet more. This all makes the simple act of breathing strained and perhaps painful.

 

Bronchodilators, or so-called rescue inhalers, are primarily aimed at loosing the grip of the outside muscles and giving the airways some freedom. Other prescribed medical drugs are used to combat congestion, mucus, and the inflammatory constriction on the airways.

While one is well advised to be under professional medical supervision for these issues, there are indeed essential oils that can assist with these efforts.

 

What can essential oils do for asthma sufferers?

There is an abundance of essential oils that have anti-inflammatory therapeutic value. When dealing with asthma, we also want an oil that is Mucolytic – that is, it contains an enzyme that breaks down mucus. We’d also like to address the congestion with oil that has expectorant properties.

 

Myrrh is used in the Breathe Easy blend as an inflammatory and expectorant, and for it’s immune and circulatory system stimulation effects. It is the circulatory system that will help carry out the residual garbage caused by the excess inflammation and mucus. It is well known for assisting to expel mucus and phlegm from the lungs. The middle note, myrtle, is an expectorant with a warm tonic effect known also for it’s use in expelling bronchial mucus and phlegm. White fir is also an expectorant, and helps clear and prevent mucus buildup in the first place. The blend helps with coughing and the associated muscle tightening in the chest.

 

Safety/Precautions/Usage

It is advised not to use myrtle during pregnancy.

All three oils are considered generally non-toxic, non-irritating. Some people may experience skin sensitivity to the White Fir.

One of the oft listed side effects of prescribed asthma inhalers is an increase in heart rate. Some essential oils will increase blood pressure. The oils contained in the Breathe Easy blend do not have this property. It was my intent that even those with high blood pressure could use this inhaler.

Can be used daily as needed.

Blending

Putting together a blend to use in an inhaler is a very quick and easy way to deliver the therapeutic and aromatic effects of the essential oils.

Because an inhaler blend is undiluted it’s best to use the 1-2-3 formula. That is one drop base note, two drops of the middle note, and three drops of the top note.

For this blend, in a small bowl or shot glass, drop into it 1 drop of Myrrh essential oil. This is the base note. Add to it 2 drops of Myrtle, which is our middle note. Then add 3 drops of the top note, White Fir. Swirl them slightly to mix.

Place the cotton swab from the inhaler in the bowl and let it soak up the oil blend.

Insert the cotton into the inhaler case. Seal with the end cap.

Label and date all of your blends. Essential oils tend to lose their effectiveness over time from exposure to air causing oxidation. It’s important to keep the inhaler sealed when not in use.

 

Added Thoughts

You can purchase inhaler blanks online with the cotton piece included. Since essential oils usage through aromatherapy has become increasingly popular, more stylistic inhalers have become available. You can now have an easy solution close by in your purse, suit pocket, or gym bag, when you need that extra help breathing.

 

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