Myrrh Spiritual Meaning

Myrrh Spiritual Meaning

Myrrh is the first oil mentioned in the Bible in Genesis 37:25, when Joseph’s jealous brothers sold him into slavery to a caravan of Midianites (incense traders) that we on their way to Egypt. The Scriptures tell us that the caravan was carrying “balm and myrrh.” Years later during the famine, Joseph’s brothers came to Egypt to buy food where they encountered Joseph as the Egyptian ruler. Interestingly, Jacob, their father (Israel), told his sons to bring gifts for the Prince and the Scriptures tells us in Genesis 43:11, they brought him “balm and myrrh”- the same two oils that accompanied Joseph into slavery.

Not only is myrrh the first oil mentioned in the Bible, it is also the last one mentioned in Revelation 18:13, which describes the destruction of Babylon when all of these wonderful fragrances and ointments will be no more. Myrrh is rich with symbolism and is mentioned 156 times in the Bible.

The Greek word for myrrh is “smurna,” which shares the same root name of the city and church mentioned in the book of Revelation. Smyrna was the second church of the seven churches of Asia John was instructed to write in Revelation 2:8-11. Interestingly, this church was distinguished as being persecuted and understood the bitterness of mistreatment for the sake of the Gospel.

Myrrh was also one of the first gum resins/oil given as a gift to Yeshua as a child by the Magi. Matthew 2:11 tells us, “And when they were come into the house, they saw the young child with Mary his mother, and fell down, and worshiped him: and when they had opened their treasures, they presented unto him gifts; gold, and frankincense, and myrrh.” Certainly by no coincidence, myrrh was also the last oil offered to Yeshua at Golgotha when He was delivered to be crucified. In Mark 15:23 we read how they offered Him, “wine mingled with myrrh,” but He refused it. Yeshua refused the myrrh as a pain-reliever, because He agreed to come down in the form of man and drink from the cup of suffering and that He did. As the Alpha and the Omega – the Alef and the Tov – the beginning and the end – He identified with us in His pain and sorrow, so that we could have the courage to seek and know Him intimately through the fellowship of suffering.